The Girl Next Door (28)

Last week I began to read Ray Bradbury’s Zen and the Art of Writing for the second time. I tried to resist, read pieces of the Bonnie Friedman, the Annie Dillard. But they didn’t move me. The first day I read the Bradbury it made me cry. Goldberg’s work makes me cry, too. Today I read Bradbury in the courtyard in the late afternoon with the sun in my eyes. He says in order to feed your muse, “you should always have been hungry about life since you were a child.” I wonder if this is true for me. I kind of think not. But maybe so—just a quieter version than I feel from him. And I have imagined for a good while I’d like to be more avid, more eager, more vibrantly alive. Might I be on the road to that even now as I move my pen across the page? I think, too, he grew up in a different world, one I was lucky enough to touch when I was a little girl, like the last sip on the tip of my tongue. The carnival came to his town, real people who talked to him. The magician sent him home with the rabbit from his show. The world was smaller then. It makes me wish I’d been the girl next door—oh, that’s Ray’s friend Riba. I wish I’d felt the silky fur of that magician’s rabbit underneath my hand, that I was sprawled on the ground with the other neighborhood kids listening to his father’s voice in the dark, telling stories of his own childhood when there were no roads heading west, only dirt tracks and the new railroad, or lying on our backs looking up at the sky filled with stars and tasting awe for the first time in our young lives.

2 thoughts on “The Girl Next Door (28)

  1. Riba, as always your writings take me out of this time and place. You’re such an amazingly vibrant person, if may broadcast that here on your blog. I know (darn, I can’t do italics here for k.n.o.w.!) you had the kinds of experiences you are describing. Keep describing them. : )

  2. Thanks, Laurie.

    I just pale next to Ray Bradbury—especially his childhood memories and experiences. Did you know he remembers being born? ;-)

    But I completely appreciate and embrace your encouragement here. Thank you, again. :)

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